Facebook will begin beaming advertisements into virtual reality

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Well, it was only a matter of time.

Advertising giant Facebook announced Wednesday that they’re going to begin testing advertising inside virtual reality titles on its Oculus platform soon. The first roll-out is limited enough, with Facebook testing ads inside a single gaming shooter title: Blaston from Resolution Games. They are interestingly not rolling this out with a first-party title, though I’m sure integration with Oculus Studio titles is inevitable.

“For now, this is a test with a few apps—once we see how this test goes and incorporate feedback from developers and the community, we’ll provide more details on when ads may become more broadly available across the Oculus Platform and in the Oculus mobile app,” a company blog post reads.

Users will be able to mute, hide or see information on why they are being served an ad in its current form.

It’s an unsurprising development for a platform that Facebook has long been bankrolling with little regard for current revenues, nevertheless Facebook liekly realizes that there are going to be plenty of privacy questions and addressed some of them head-on. The biggest admission is that Facebook says they will not be using any data stored locally on the Oculus headset, including images from the device’s cameras to target ads. They also say, somewhat less emphatically, that “have no plans to use movement data to target ads.”

Facebook is likely realizing that they probably should’ve published a blog post years ago declaring that they were indeed not using smartphone microphones to monitor conversations and target ads (mainly because they have access to better personal information via adtech data partners anyway, but I digress) before those narratives took off. Facebook specifically notes they don’t use audio conversations on the headset for ad targeting.

Virtual reality has been a labor of future-minded thinking for Facebook since the beginning, they’ve spent billions bankrolling the ecosystem and this move seems to signal that they believe they’ve wandered over some sort of adoption hump and are nearing the time to start more aggressively monetizing.

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